Saturday, 19 October 2013

Lynn-Marie Gildersleeve Featured Artist

Sell Art Online


Lynn-Marie says, "My passion comes from the ordinary and some times extraordinary objects I see each day. There is no subject I see not worth capturing and if done well, I find its personality and give it the attention it deserves. I am an amateur with a passion to learn more of this craft. My work has been hung in various local venues (mostly eateries) and I enjoy sharing tips and experiences with other photographers. This gallery is small in comparison to what can be found on Pbase as well as on my print on demand store Lasgalen Arts."

Art Prints

Photography Prints

Sell Art Online

Art Prints

Photography Prints

Photography Prints

Sell Art Online

Photography Prints

Art Prints

Please visit Lynn-Marie Gildersleeve by clicking on the link below,


A Happy Weekend To All!

-Zeana

________________________________________







______________________________________

beauty mixed media
beauty paintings
beauty digital art
beauty photos
beauty canvas prints
beauty prints
beauty framed prints
beauty acrylic prints
beauty metal prints
beauty greeting cards
beauty posters

Thursday, 17 October 2013

Anthony Rego Featured Artist

Photography Prints


Anthony says, "While I primarily focus on Portraiture and Nature, in reality I would love to photograph just about anything, from the very small, to the very large, to anywhere in-between.

Nature in general intrigues me. Take a stroll outside in the summer and its pretty much like switching on the Discovery Channel. It only takes a keen eye and an intriguing curiosity to observe the little things along the way that make this world such an interesting place.

Feel free to browse my galleries, and see what intrigues you. Your feedback is welcome and all important, and so is your support and encouragement. If you see a picture below that you really like, you have the options of purchasing a Stretched Canvas Print, a framed print, a gallery wrap, acrylic print or a greeting card with that Picture or any combination of the above."

Art Prints

Sell Art Online

Sell Art Online

Sell Art Online

Art Prints

Photography Prints

Sell Art Online

Photography Prints

Photography Prints

Please enjoy a visit to Anthony Rego's art portfolio by clicking below.


______________________________________




Saturday, 12 October 2013

Edgar Degas


Early Years of Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas was born in Paris as the son of a wealthy banker. He studied art at the famous Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. After having finished his studies he went to Italy where he stayed for five year studying and copying meticulously the old masters of the Renaissance. His decision to study the old masters was typical for his personality - that of a perfectionist.

Back in France in 1859, Degas exhibited his works for the first five years at the official Salon in Paris. Later he joined the Impressionists and showed his art work in their exhibitions from 1874 to 1886.


Subjects and Style

The favorite subjects of Degas were scenes from the world of entertainment and later from everyday's life. Ballet dancers, little ballerinas, women in intimate situations and horse races are the subjects that are immediately associated with him.

Degas in contrast to his impressionist colleagues, preferred to work in a studio. He made sketches of his subjects on the spot and created the painting later in his studio. Toulouse-Lautrec, who was a great admirer of Edgar Degas, had the same work style.

Japanese prints were very popular at the end of the nineteenth century and had a great influence on the French impressionists. Edgar Degas was one of the admirers of Japanese prints. And the influence can be seen in some of his daring compositions using large areas of flat colors.

Degas was an artist torn between traditional art and the modern impressionist movement. He admired the French artist Ingres and the great Italian painters. His own compositions of images are harmonious and follow the traditions of the old masters. And what often looks like the spontaneous sketch of a genial moment, was in reality the elaborate result of a perfectionist.

From the impressionists he had learned the use of creating effects with light, a daring use of colors and new ways to show the human figure in motion. And from the Japanese ukiyo-e masters he had learned the use of space.



Edgar Degas as a Printmaker and Sculptor

Degas used a wide variety of mediums and techniques. When he grew older, he turned to sculpturing, pastels and printmaking.

In his thrive for perfection, he repeated the same subjects again and again. When he concentrated on printmaking in the nineties, his preferred subjects were female nudes, either nude women at their toilette or nude dancers. Edgar Degas had a collection of decorative utensils like a bathtub, a sofa and a curtained bed in a corner of his studio.


During the war with Germany in 1870-1871 Degas served in the French army. The medical cause is not known, but since his time in the military service, he had problems with his eyes.

In his late years the artist's eyesight deteriorated more and more. He was unable to create oil paintings and focused his artistic creativity on sculptures. Degas formed his sculptures using wax or clay. Favorite subjects were ballerinas or race horses.

When Degas had passed away, he left more than 2000 oil paintings and pastels and 150 sculptures. The sculpture models were all cast after his death.

Wishing you all a great weekend!
-Zeana

Romanovna Fine Art

Portfolio and Contact






Friday, 4 October 2013

Andy Mercer Featured Artist

Sell Art Online

Andy says,
Award winning and published artist
Runner up and finalist in UK and international competitions
My work can also be purchased at Habitat and Dwell major UK national retailers.

Work in private collections in England,USA,Canada,France,Spain,Australia and Mexico

Art Prints

Photography Prints

Art Prints

Art Prints

Andy Mercer goes on to say
Many of these works are also available as SIGNED LIMITED EDITION PRINTS, please contact me for further details

Fine Art America is an approved supplier of reproductions for my art. I'm not able to sign works sold via this site but all the works have been personally approved. Please contact me if you would like a signed certificate of authenticity for any work purchased on this site, this will distinguish your piece if the work becomes generally available as a low cost reproduction.

'The rules are - there are no rules.'

You can contact Andy Mercer at his personal website by clicking here and at the bottom of this post that you can visit him on fineartamerica.com  Andy Mercer's Art

Sell Art Online

Photography Prints

Photography Prints

Sell Art Online

Sell Art Online

As you can no doubt see, Andy is an extremely prolific artist as well as having a great dedication to produce his own unique style.

Visit him by clicking below! It's a must see.


_______________________________________________




abstract photos
abstract canvas prints
impressionism metal prints
impressionism acrylic prints
impressionism photos
wall art metal prints
wall art acrylic prints
orange metal prints
orange acrylic prints
digital acrylic prints
digital metal prints

natural photos
natural mixed media
natural digital art
natural paintings

Rembrandt's Reformation As An Artist


Rembrandt van Rijn (1606–1669) is perhaps the quintessential Reformation artist. He began his artistic career following in the footsteps of his contemporary painters. His style in his youth was not unlike that of the great Flemish painter Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640): dramatic, sweeping, and idealized. As the circumstances of his life darkened, and his faith was tested, the changes that took place in his spirit became evident through all his paintings. Rembrandt had experienced a true turning point in his life that forced him to begin to take his faith seriously, rather than use his faith as a mere tool from which to obtain motifs for his paintings. While Rembrandt was not as overtly influenced by the Reformers as Bach evidently was, the Reformed notions of the person and work of Christ, salvation, and the centrality of the Bible stand out clearly in his work.

Rembrandt’s maturation as an artist can be traced alongside the circumstances of his life. During his early years, he was influenced by his contemporaries, especially Lastman, his tutor. Lastman developed his style in Italy, using motifs from history and the Bible. The art of the Counter-Reformation, with its emphasis on idealizing the subjects of the Bible, was dominant in Flanders during Rembrandt’s life, and this style had a powerful influence on Rembrandt at first. Rembrandt in his youth was attracted to the Bible not primarily because of its spiritual worth or because of its authority in the faith of the Church, but because it offered a plethora of dramatic themes fraught with heroes and villains and dazzling victories and ignominious defeats.

In the years after the death of his wife, Saskia, and his impending financial collapse (1648–1656), Rembrandt’s shift in style became more apparent. Rembrandt faced a crisis of faith, and his attitude toward his standing with God changed dramatically. He realized that he was in no position to pridefully assert himself, in no position to find his security in his wealth. No longer did Rembrandt look to the Bible simply as a sourcebook for new themes for his artwork. The Bible became his link to God, and the source of his spiritual vitality as well as his art. Instead of merely painting the subjects of the Bible, he interpreted the Bible in his art, much as Bach had interpreted the Bible in his music.

Abraham’s obedience on Mt. Moriah, as recounted in Gen 22, is a favorite subject of Rembrandt’s. The first time that Rembrandt depicted this theme in 1635 (The Angel Stopping Abraham from Sacrificing Isaac to God), he was a young and wealthy artist living in Amsterdam. He had not yet made his shift from idealism to realism—the Reformation standard of depicting God’s world without theatrics had not yet made its impact on Rembrandt. It is remarkable to compare his first depiction of this theme in 1635 with his second depiction of 1655. In the first example, shown below, we have the earlier painting, and Rembrandt’s dramatic portrayal of the biblical event is clear. Abraham has stretched his son out upon the altar, clasping the boy’s face and widely exposing his neck for the slice of the knife. Rembrandt captures the moment when the angel stops Abraham, so the viewer sees the knife drop from his hand and the look of surprise and amazement on his face. The typical Baroque obsession with the drama of the miracle and the movement of the subjects is evident in this piece.


But compare this work with the second piece (Abraham’s Sacrifice), painted in 1655, when Rembrandt’s wisdom and the influence of the Reformation ideal of faith and simplicity are more obvious. The emphasis in this later work is upon Abraham. This earthly father who has been confronted with a crisis of faith without comparison is about to offer the supreme act of obedience to God’s command. The conflict that raged with Abraham’s spirit is depicted in this etching. It is the inner reality that Rembrandt emphasized in this work, not the outward dazzle of the intervention of the angel of the Lord. Isaac, in contrast to the earlier painting, is not stretched out on an altar, but kneels humbly at his father’s side. He is not a muscular, superhuman figure as he is in the 1635 depiction, but is a small boy in the later one. The angel comes from behind Abraham, and is invisible to him, rather than revealing himself in splendor. Note that Abraham’s eyes are darkened, likely demonstrating that his faith is blind. Abraham, as Rom 4:3 reveals, was a man who believed God, and God accounted his faith to him as righteousness. The stark differences between the two works are evident even in their titles. The 1635 depiction has a long and descriptive title, one that underscores the drama of the miracle itself. In contrast, the title of the 1655 depiction is a simple one, leaving the viewer to find its meaning in the work as well as the biblical text.


Rembrandt van Rijn’s life presents us with a powerful example of how Christ fundamentally alters one’s perspective on life. Having been given new life in Christ, Rembrandt saw himself under His gaze, and his response was to humble himself and to become Christ’s servant. Hundreds of years later, we are still benefiting from the devotion of Rembrandt to Christ that is reflected in his art.

Until next week, I hope you enjoy reading about the Master Rembrandt.

___________________________________________




___________________________________________________

landscape posters
landscape greeting cards
landscape metal prints
landscape acrylic prints
landscape framed prints
landscape prints
landscape canvas prints
landscape photos
landscape digital art
landscape paintings
landscape mixed media
vivid posters
vivid greeting cards
vivid metal prints
vivid acrylic prints
vivid framed prints
vivid prints
vivid canvas prints
vivid photos
vivid paintings
vivid digital art
vivid mixed media
romanovna paintings